Who learns young, forgets not when he (or she) is old

 

Picture page Who learns young

“If you don’t learn how to use a hammer as a child, you’re likely to be a terrible carpenter as an adult. Which brings the old adage to mind: Who learns young, forgets not when he is old.”

Or she!    

zeer jonge klussers..

The idea behind ToolKid is to inspire children to get interested in making things with their hands from an early age, thus enabling them to acquire (practical) skills from which they will be able to profit later on: ‘Who learns young, forgets not when he (or she) is old.’

Today, children’s development can often be a one-sided process. Studies (e.g., Lemmens, Valkenburg, Peter, 2010) have shown that, both at school and during leisure such activities as watching television or gaming, or sitting in front of the computer, children play an all-too-passive role and their creativity is given hardly any stimulation at all.

This is one of the reasons why the importance assigned to industrial arts instruction is undergoing an upward revision. Industrial arts clubs with professional supervision are growing in popularity, and industrial arts are now amongst the activities available at daycare centers. At home, as well, parents are devoting increased attention to finding the right balance between school, sport and leisure time for their children.

Picture page Who learns young3

The new tool set from ToolKid is however not just an intelligent alternative to watching TV, gaming and sitting in front of the computer. ToolKid developer Jos van de Vliet: “If you don’t learn how to use a hammer as a child, you’re likely to be a terrible carpenter as an adult.” For children who have gained experience using authentic children’s tools, the switch to grownup’s tools at the age of twelve or older is ‘child’s play.’